SHAUN SMITH'S SUNDAY SUNDRIES

Share |

A WEEKLY ROUNDUP OF INTERNET CURIOSITIES FROM THE BOOK WORLD

Purple
As writer Barbara Lampert reminds us, Doctor Johnson once famously advised, “Read over your compositions and where ever you meet with a passage which you think is particularly fine, strike it out.” Lampert has created a sort of online graveyard for such stuff, where she has invited writers to send her their purple prose that's been red inked.

Daffodils
If there is anyone left who does not understand the labyrinth of the Amazon-vs-Apple-&-Publishers spat, NYRB's Jason Epstein provides as clear a summary as you are likely to find, and some not bad analysis to boot.

Opening
The Guardian's Robert Crumb offers up what he feels are The 10 best first lines in fiction, to which I say ... meh, stupid exercise. With the exception of the Wodehouse, which I like because it is quite funny, I could live without all of them. My favourite opening line in all of fiction is this: "He lay flat on the brown, pine-needled floor of the forest, his chin on his folded arms, and high overhead the wind blew in the tops of the pine trees."

Rare
In the bowels of a rare-book library at Brown University, the NYTs informs us, an archivist recently made a discovery of a rare print by an engraver who became famous for other things — Paul Revere.

Baloney
"The Art of Manliness" offers up a bunch of very good reasons why guys need to read more fiction.

Lights
The famous City Lights bookstore has a podcast blog. Who knew?

Arch
And just for fun: a book arch.

The views expressed in the Writer-in-Residence blogs are those held by the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of Open Book: Toronto.

Shaun Smith

Shaun Smith is a novelist and journalist living in Toronto. His young adult novel Snakes & Ladders was published in January 2009 by the Dundurn Group.

Go to Shaun Smith ’s Author Page