Blogs

The Great Canadian Writer's Craft Interview: Shannon Maguire

This spring, students from Malvern Collegiate Institute's Writer's Craft class conducted interviews with Canadian poets as part of a class project. The interviews will be posted on The Great Canadian Writer's Craft page on Open Book throughout June and July. In this interview, poet Shannon Maguire speaks with student Erin Hanley.

Tending toward liquid

Habit makes time relative for us. At twenty, the faces surrounding us have no history except in the present of the gaze we turn toward them. So, young adults, old people, and children seem forever framed in a “just as I see you” that makes them impervious to change. Later, one discovers that faces and bodies are material for transformation. One guesses then that time’s function is to pass very much alive like a current of heat and thought through the bodies gifted with this canny intelligence from which we learn to endow ourselves over the course of the years so as to repress elegantly the idea of death like the very last dregs.
  —Nicole Brossard, Intimate Journal, Trans. Barbara Godard

The Great Canadian Writer's Craft Interview: Christine Leclerc

This spring, students from Malvern Collegiate Institute's Writer's Craft class conducted interviews with Canadian poets as part of a class project. The interviews will be posted on The Great Canadian Writer's Craft page on Open Book throughout June and July. In this interview, poet Christine Leclerc speaks with students Adam Ammirato and Sam Alkins .

Our lives of no interest: The compulsion to confess

In middle age there is a mystery, there is mystification. The most I can make out of this hour is a kind of loneliness. Even the beauty of the visible world seems to crumble, yes even love. I feel that there has been some miscarriage, some wrong turn, but I do not know when it took place and I have no hope of finding it.
  
—John Cheever, The Journals of John Cheever

The Great Canadian Writer's Craft Interview: Paul Dutton

This spring, students from Malvern Collegiate Institute's Writer's Craft class conducted interviews with Canadian poets as part of a class project. The interviews will posted on The Great Canadian Writer's Craft page on Open Book throughout June and July. In this interview, poet Paul Dutton speaks with students Spencer Leefe and Emily Booth.

Hello Mr. Dutton,

A month in the life of the launching author

Today marks one month since May 31, the official publication date of my new novel The Oakdale Dinner Club, and one month since I started my residency here at Open Book Toronto.

Within the month of June, I:

- wrote and posted 16 blog posts (whew!), some instructional, some confessional, and some about what to eat, because food is important
- went to my first speaking engagement on behalf of the book, where I made jokes to a receptive audience and also sold some books
- held a successful book launch party, with shots and country line dancing, yeehaw

The Great Canadian Writer's Craft Interview: Sarah Dowling

This spring, students from Malvern Collegiate Institute's Writer's Craft class conducted interviews with Canadian poets as part of a class project. The interviews will posted on The Great Canadian Writer's Craft page on Open Book throughout June and July. In this interview, poet Sarah Dowling speaks with students Kate and Solanaa.

What to Eat While Reading: Savoury Stilton Pecan Shortbread

My novel The Oakdale Dinner Club is about two women who become friends in their senior year of high school after they hand in identical answer sheets for a math test and are accused of cheating. They didn’t cheat – not consciously – but one of the two, high all-round achiever Mary Ann Gray, thinks maybe she and alterna-hippie Alice Maeda may have inadvertently read each other’s minds when they took the test. So Mary Ann invites Alice over after school and conducts a telepathy experiment between bites of some savoury Stilton shortbreads that Mary Ann’s mother baked that afternoon.

Forget Cottage Country: 8 Reasons to Summer in the City of Toronto

School’s out and the Canada Day weekend is nigh, but that’s no reason to get out of town. Stay here, and enjoy these only-in-Toronto good things instead:

1. Toronto Island

Bike down to the ferry docks on a weekday morning, take the ferry over Hanlan’s Point, and ride the paved path to Ward’s Island. Enjoy the lake breezes and views along the way. Stop for a muffin and coffee at the Ward’s Island café, cycle around Algonquin Island and admire the Island cottages, then bike back to Hanlan’s to take the ferry back to the city. An idyllic hour and a half-long country-in-the-city experience.

2. The Moore Park Ravine system in midtown Toronto

The Great Canadian Writer's Craft Interview: Stephen Collis

This spring, students from Malvern Collegiate Institute's Writer's Craft class conducted interviews with Canadian poets as part of a class project. The interviews will posted on The Great Canadian Writer's Craft page on Open Book throughout June and July. In this interview, poet Stephen Collis speaks with students Palita Timm and Jessica Glazer.

Hi Mr. Collis!

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